Category Archives: MCSA Windows 7 70-685

Find Hidden Features On Chrome’s Internal Chrome:// Pages

Google Chrome’s internal chrome:// pages contain experimental features, diagnostic tools and detailed statistics. They’re hidden in Chrome’s user interface, so you have to know they exist to find them. These hidden pages are Chrome’s version of Firefox’s about: pages.

You can access each by typing chrome://, followed by the name of the page — you can also use the more traditional about: prefix, which redirects you to the chrome:// URL.

Chrome://About

The chrome://about page lists all Chrome’s internal pages. Click any of the links to access the page. Many of them are the same pages you can access from Chrome’s menus — for example, chrome://bookmarks is the bookmarks manager and chrome://settings is Chrome’s options page.

There are also a few special URLs for debugging purposes located near the bottom of the page — for example, you can enter chrome://kill in the address bar to kill the current tab.

Chrome://Flags

The chrome://flags page, formerly known as the chrome://labs page, is probably the most interesting internal page. This page contains a treasure trove of experimental features that aren’t yet enabled by default — Google warns you that your browser may “spontaneously combust” if you enable these features. They may have security, privacy or stability problems or cause data loss. Use these options at your own risk!

New features often turn up here before they become enabled by default.

For example, you can enable the “Enable NTP Bookmark Features” option to add the experimental bookmark interface to Chrome’s new tab page. The new bookmark manager isn’t enabled by default in Chrome 16, but it probably will be in a newer version. This feature has been removed from Chrome 17, which shows how quickly these flags can vanish or break.

Chrome://Sessions

Another feature buried on Chrome’s chrome://flags page is the “Enable Syncing Open Tabs” option, which adds an “Open Tabs” option to Chrome’s sync settings.

After you enable this option, you’ll find a list of your other browser sessions on the chrome://sessions page. This feature will eventually be enabled by default and exposed in Chrome’s user interface, but you can use it now.

Chrome://Memory & Chrome://Tasks

The chrome://memory page gives you a breakdown of Chrome’s memory usage. It shows you just how much memory each extension, app and web page is using. If other browsers, such as Mozilla Firefox or Internet Explorer, are running, it’ll also show the other browsers’ memory usage.

This is the same page you can access by clicking the “Stats for nerds” link at the bottom of Chrome’s Task Manager window. Open the Task Manager by right-clicking Chrome’s title bar and selecting Task Manager or access the chrome://tasks URL to open it in a tab.

Chrome://Net-Internals

The chrome://net-internals page is packed full of network diagnostic information and tools. It can capture network data and dump it to a file, making it a useful tool for troubleshooting Chrome network problems.

Most of the tools here won’t be useful to average users, but the Tests page contains a particularly useful tool. If a website won’t load, you can plug its address into the Tests page and Chrome will attempt to determine the problem for you.

Chrome://Crashes

The chrome://crashes page lists crashes that have occurred. You’ll only see crashes here if you have the “Automatically send usage statistics and crash reports to Google” option enabled on the Under the Hood tab in Chrome’s settings.

Chrome://Tracing

The chrome://tracing page is a developer tool that allows you to analyze Chrome’s performance. Click Record and Chrome will start logging browser activity.

After stopping the record process, you can dig into the activity and see what’s taking up the most time. If you have a page that performs slowly in Chrome, you can see what part of your code Chrome is struggling with.


Many of the other pages are technical pages listing debug information. For example, the chrome://flash page lists information about the flash plug-in and the chrome://sync-internals page displays the state of Chrome’s sync process. Feel free to explore the rest on your own.

Advertisements

Restore Your USB Key to it’s original state (Format Linux USB on Windows)

Restore Your USB Key to it’s original state

After having tooled around with a USB Linux version using your image overwritten or multi partitioned flash pen drive, you might find it necessary to revert it back to a single fat partition (restore the flash pen drive to it’s original state) that can again be read by all computers. Windows users can follow the Windows instructions below to Restore a Flash Drive using the HP USB Format Tool. For those working from Linux this task can easily be accomplished via the Linux Flash Drive Restoration tutorial that follows.

Restoring your USB key to it’s original state using Windows/Mac OS:

Windows and or Mac OS users could use the SD Formatter Tool to reformat and restore a USB Drive.

SD Formatter

Creating and formatting a hard disk partition

To create a partition or volume (the two terms are often used interchangeably) on a hard disk, you must be logged in as an administrator, and there must be either unallocated disk space or free space within an extended partition on the hard disk.

If there is no unallocated disk space, you can create some by shrinking an existing partition, deleting a partition, or by using a third-party partitioning program. For more information, see Can I repartition my hard disk?

For information about reformatting a hard disk, see Formatting disks and drives: frequently asked questions.

To create and format a new partition (volume)

  1. Open Computer Management by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Security, clicking Administrative Tools, and then double-clicking Computer Management. Administrator permission required If you’re prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

  2. In the left pane, under Storage, click Disk Management.

  3. Right-click an unallocated region on your hard disk, and then click New Simple Volume.

  4. In the New Simple Volume Wizard, click Next.

  5. Type the size of the volume you want to create in megabytes (MB) or accept the maximum default size, and then clickNext.

  6. Accept the default drive letter or choose a different drive letter to identify the partition, and then click Next.

  7. In the Format Partition dialog box, do one of the following:

    • If you don’t want to format the volume right now, click Do not format this volume, and then click Next.

    • To format the volume with the default settings, click Next.

  8. Review your choices, and then click Finish.

Note

  • When you create new partitions on a basic disk, the first three will be formatted as primary partitions. Beginning with the fourth, each one will be configured as a logical drive within an extended partition.

To format an existing partition (volume)

Warning

  • Formatting a volume will destroy any data on the partition. Be sure to back up any data you want to save before you begin.

  1. Open Computer Management by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Security, clicking Administrative Tools, and then double-clicking Computer Management. Administrator permission required If you’re prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

  2. In the left pane, under Storage, click Disk Management.

  3. Right-click the volume that you want to format, and then click Format.

  4. To format the volume with the default settings, in the Format dialog box, click OK, and then click OK again.

Notes

  • You cannot format a disk or partition that is currently in use, including the partition that contains Windows.

  • The Perform a quick format option will create a new file table, but will not fully overwrite or erase the volume. Aquick format is much faster than a normal format, which fully erases any existing data on the volume.