NAS – Network Attached Storage / NAS vs. SAN / UFS Explorer NAS data recovery

Network-attached storage (NAS) is file-level computer data storage connected to a computer network providing data access to a heterogeneousgroup of clients. NAS not only operates as a file server, but is specialized for this task either by its hardware, software, or configuration of those elements. NAS is often manufactured as a computer appliance – a specialized computer built from the ground up for storing and serving files – rather than simply a general purpose computer being used for the role

NAS vs. SAN

NAS provides both storage and a file system. This is often contrasted with SAN (Storage Area Network), which provides only block-based storage and leaves file system concerns on the “client” side. SAN protocols include Fibre ChanneliSCSIATA over Ethernet (AoE) and HyperSCSI.

One way to loosely conceptualize the difference between a NAS and a SAN is that NAS appears to the client OS (operating system) as a file server (the client can map network drives to shares on that server) whereas a disk available through a SAN still appears to the client OS as a disk, visible in disk and volume management utilities (along with client’s local disks), and available to be formatted with a file system and mounted.

Despite their differences, SAN and NAS are not mutually exclusive, and may be combined as a SAN-NAS hybrid, offering both file-level protocols (NAS) and block-level protocols (SAN) from the same system. An example of this is Openfiler, a free software product running on Linux-based systems. Ashared disk file system can also be run on top of a SAN to provide filesystem services.

File:SANvsNAS.svg

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Posted on March 9, 2014, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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